One Man's Quest for the Perfect Mono Synth

chysn

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Re: One Man's Quest for the Perfect Mono Synth
« Reply #420 on: April 26, 2022, 07:21:15 PM »
This sends my thoughts spiraling into dreams of selling my two Odysseys to finance the M.

Heh. That seems like it would be out of character! That would be a classic dearly-departed Razmo move! Not that there's anything wrong with that.

I think you nailed the problem. If you insist on stereo, duplicating a 2600 patch would be soul-sucking. You probably wouldn't feel like playing anything afterward.

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Non-programmable synthesizers deter experimentation, because it's just too much of an effort to get the instrument back to a basic useful patch.

It deters experimentation if you care about getting back to a specific patch. If you're willing to let something happen that will never happen again, then it encourages experimentation. Especially when patch cables are involved.

Hardwired synths, programmable or no, deter experimentation, because you can't do anything with the signal path. If you really want experimentation, there's probably no better synth than the 2600. But chances are, you'd want the 2600 and your Odysseys, in much the same way I decided to have a modular and a Pro 3.

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I would love to see a re-issued ARP Solus or Axxe.

I usually don't look back, but parting with my Axxe is my biggest synth regret. Adding a reissue wouldn't do anything for me at this point, but I'd certainly be happy to see it happen. I'd be somewhat disappointed for it to get the "Mini" treatment; it's not like it's huge to begin with!
Pro 3 #1640

Other: Eurorack modular, Circuit Tracks, MicroBrute
Software: macOS, Ableton, MuseScore2, Serum, Pianoteq, OPS7
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he/him/his

Re: One Man's Quest for the Perfect Mono Synth
« Reply #421 on: April 26, 2022, 07:36:40 PM »
From observing my own behavior, I find that programmability encourages experimentation.  That's all I'm saying.  I wander much farther from home on the Prophet '08 than on the Odysseys.  If I experiment with the Odysseys and arrive at some complex sound, I tend to leave the patch up for several sessions and focus on the other instruments.  With the P'08, I tend to cover much more ground - both traditional and experimental.  This is why I would ultimately have preferred to have gone with a Sequential mono synth with the usual keyboard-module pairing, but that option didn't and doesn't exist.  A Pro 3 with a five-octave keyboard in keyboard and module forms would have been my ultimate preference. 

All this is not to complain about the Odysseys.  I'm still glad I ended up with the present system.  I only need now to upgrade to a better and longer keyboard controller.  I do miss that fifth octave very much.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2022, 08:30:41 PM by Sacred Synthesis »
"Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!"

- Henry David Thoreau

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chysn

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Re: One Man's Quest for the Perfect Mono Synth
« Reply #422 on: April 26, 2022, 08:04:24 PM »
I wander much farther from home on the Prophet '08 than on the Odysseys.  If I experiment with the Odysseys and arrive at some complex sound, I tend to leave the patch up for several sessions and focus on the other instruments.

That makes sense. Program locations can be breadcrumbs on a walk in the dark forest.

Maybe our difference of opinion here is related to recording. I rarely record anything, even if I think it's cool. I figure that I'll be able to make something just as cool again in the future, even if it's radically different.
Pro 3 #1640

Other: Eurorack modular, Circuit Tracks, MicroBrute
Software: macOS, Ableton, MuseScore2, Serum, Pianoteq, OPS7
www.wav2pro3.comwww.soundcloud.com/beige-mazewww.github.com/chysnwww.beigemaze.com

he/him/his

Re: One Man's Quest for the Perfect Mono Synth
« Reply #423 on: April 26, 2022, 08:24:33 PM »
Perhaps, Chysn.  I'm entirely composition and recording focused.  I want sounds that can be used as lines or parts of a piece of music.  Occasionally a sound effect qualifies for such a use, but it's rare.  My experimenting with sounds tends to be a sort of exercise to teach myself more about synthesis or a particular instrument.  It serves a practical purpose and isn't so much fooling around - although it is fun.  But 95% of the time, I'm striving for immediate musical uses.

Yet, this monophonic synthesizer quest has always been an intended experiment.  I have the two polyphonic synthesizers and I don't think too much about them.  But I've wanted for years to have some type of ongoing synthesizer project which would allow for the easy insertion of parts, resulting in something complex, musically powerful, and original.  The monophonic instrument seemed like the best choice, and so it has been.  Along the way, I've come quite close to going modular, and my thinking has been partly modular.  It's just that I've stayed with internally wired "modules," as one finds in desktop versions.  But I intend to keep the whole idea open to other modules.  Presently it's Odysseys, but who knows what I might add to the system in the future?  In spite of the complication, I would ideally prefer two full-sized 2600s, but the price makes that impossible.  So, Odysseys it is. 

Still, the mono synth project is an open-ended one, and I expect to add other items as they appear.  That's why I hope the re-issues continue.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2022, 09:44:18 PM by Sacred Synthesis »
"Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!"

- Henry David Thoreau

The Musical Synthesizer YouTube Channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChLGwGiRVs7rlZXnOG9_mUw

The Musical Synthesizer Blog: https://themusicalsynthesizer.wordpress.com