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Your Thoughts on Copright Restrictions

Your Thoughts on Copright Restrictions
« on: December 25, 2018, 01:14:35 PM »
I noticed that in the manual it clearly states that the 8dio samples may not be transferred to any other hardware or software sampler. Furthermore, there may (or may not be) watermarks in the samples. Let's assume there are watermarks and I will be liable for any unauthorized use of the samples. This is unprecedented as far as I know for a hardware synthesizer.

I would like to fully own something which I spent so much money on. I'm unhappy with this and unhappy for the wrong information I was given through sequential stating that this only applies if I want to make and sell sample sets. Again, the manual specifically says I can't transfer the samples to any hardware or software sampler. That is plain and simple english and I don't see how anyone would not understand it. Is there a lawyer in here? I don't think you need to be a lawyer to interpret this.

Re: Your Thoughts on Copright Restrictions
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2018, 02:56:31 PM »
As long as the samples are used to make and release music you are fine. You can't use them to make and sell sample sets. This has been covered ad nauseum here already. Just make music and don't worry about it.

Re: Your Thoughts on Copright Restrictions
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2018, 09:06:48 PM »
This is a non issue. As long as you aren't taking 8Dio's samples and selling them as your own, you are fine. I've used the PX in about 5 soundtracks in 2018 and haven't had 8Dio or Sequential come knocking on my door.
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Re: Your Thoughts on Copright Restrictions
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2018, 02:18:04 AM »
So, if I made a Bank of Patches on the PX that uses their Samples, would that be ok to sell?  Thinking about getting one.
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Re: Your Thoughts on Copright Restrictions
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2018, 04:41:39 AM »
So, if I made a Bank of Patches on the PX that uses their Samples, would that be ok to sell?  Thinking about getting one.

Or even using your own samples of would be fine. You are making a bank so it would be good either way. You aren't selling thier samples as a recorded version to be loaded in other samplers from other companies. You would be selling a bank for the X. What you wouldn't be able to do according to Sequential is sample the X's sample bank, package that up and then sell it for people to load into other same machines like the octatrack, volca sample, MPC, Ableton, etc. Other than that you are all good. I would think this is fairly common with any sample library.

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Re: Your Thoughts on Copright Restrictions
« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2018, 02:36:45 AM »
It's the samples in their raw form they are talking about... in fact that is not only 8DIO that make this claim, other sample manufacturers do this as well when they sell sample packs... they restrict you from resampling the waveforms in their raw form, or even play them "stand alone" in a composition... the hint here is: Change the sample in some way, so that it does not retain it's original raw form, and you're good to go... you have (so to speak) to make your own imprint on the sounds.

So if you use their samples in the PX engine, to create something that does not sound EXACTLY like the raw material, you're good... and if you did not do that when creating a PX program, then what would be the reason for that? that is what you want to be able to do with a sample synthesizer anyway; mangle the shit out of the raw building blocks. It's like if you were allowed to create designs using LEGO, just not creating exact copies of the LEGO bricks themselves.

They do not want to restrict you making music... they just want to restrict you from selling their samples so they can be used as building blocks in other gear as well. In theory you could even create your own programs using their samples, and then sample those programs and sell those as a sample pack because these samples are NOT their samples in their original form... they are altered by the synthesis engine completely... they are only BASED on the raw building blocks.
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Re: Your Thoughts on Copright Restrictions
« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2018, 04:47:56 AM »
It's the samples in their raw form they are talking about... in fact that is not only 8DIO that make this claim, other sample manufacturers do this as well when they sell sample packs... they restrict you from resampling the waveforms in their raw form, or even play them "stand alone" in a composition... the hint here is: Change the sample in some way, so that it does not retain it's original raw form, and you're good to go... you have (so to speak) to make your own imprint on the sounds.

So if you use their samples in the PX engine, to create something that does not sound EXACTLY like the raw material, you're good... and if you did not do that when creating a PX program, then what would be the reason for that? that is what you want to be able to do with a sample synthesizer anyway; mangle the shit out of the raw building blocks. It's like if you were allowed to create designs using LEGO, just not creating exact copies of the LEGO bricks themselves.

They do not want to restrict you making music... they just want to restrict you from selling their samples so they can be used as building blocks in other gear as well. In theory you could even create your own programs using their samples, and then sample those programs and sell those as a sample pack because these samples are NOT their samples in their original form... they are altered by the synthesis engine completely... they are only BASED on the raw building blocks.

A DSI employee has posted here multiple times it is only raw samples being sold and that anything could be played “raw” as that is a performance of music recorded, so I think the second part of that does not apply in this case. Again this is direct from Sequential and 8dio, so this discussion is unnecessary to keep happening over and over.

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Re: Your Thoughts on Copright Restrictions
« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2018, 05:55:08 AM »
It's the samples in their raw form they are talking about... in fact that is not only 8DIO that make this claim, other sample manufacturers do this as well when they sell sample packs... they restrict you from resampling the waveforms in their raw form, or even play them "stand alone" in a composition... the hint here is: Change the sample in some way, so that it does not retain it's original raw form, and you're good to go... you have (so to speak) to make your own imprint on the sounds.

So if you use their samples in the PX engine, to create something that does not sound EXACTLY like the raw material, you're good... and if you did not do that when creating a PX program, then what would be the reason for that? that is what you want to be able to do with a sample synthesizer anyway; mangle the shit out of the raw building blocks. It's like if you were allowed to create designs using LEGO, just not creating exact copies of the LEGO bricks themselves.

They do not want to restrict you making music... they just want to restrict you from selling their samples so they can be used as building blocks in other gear as well. In theory you could even create your own programs using their samples, and then sample those programs and sell those as a sample pack because these samples are NOT their samples in their original form... they are altered by the synthesis engine completely... they are only BASED on the raw building blocks.

A DSI employee has posted here multiple times it is only raw samples being sold and that anything could be played “raw” as that is a performance of music recorded, so I think the second part of that does not apply in this case. Again this is direct from Sequential and 8dio, so this discussion is unnecessary to keep happening over and over.

I believe that what is understood by "raw unaltered form" is that the samples themselves, unaltered and recorded, for the purpose of selling is what is not allowed... I'm fully aware, that by playing them raw in a musical context, where they overlap in different ways because of melodies being played or grooves being performed is quite alright... and yes... it has been debated more than enough, but as it seems to keep on being subject to confusion, i find no harm in repeating the rules...
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