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is choosing the Rev2 too risky?

Razmo

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Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #20 on: May 29, 2018, 04:57:52 AM »
When I bought my REV2 keys some time ago, it worked well, except for voice instabillities, but these seems to have been fixed with OS updates since then... I've always hated digital encoders because they tend to skip values or go crazy with prolonged use over time, but that's just what you have to accept because they all seem to keep using them... luckily, DSI has stopped using them for values other than those that really require them for easy incrementations.... on my previous REV2 keys, two encoders showed a little erratic behavior right out of the box, not much, but a little... but I've seen this behavior on other products as well... it's why I hate them.

In two days time I'll be buying a module version so I assume I'll have the same behavior from some of the encoders, but personally i do not care because I also hate when knobs have more than one function, so I'll be controlling it and edit sounds via an editor, and that more or less solves the problem... in fact I could do without the user interface at all if that was an option.
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Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #21 on: May 29, 2018, 09:29:18 AM »
... in fact I could do without the user interface at all if that was an option.

That's ironic, because the fact that a synth has many knobs and buttons is the primary reason why people prefer them to software, including myself. For the gratifying and immediate hands-on experience. But that can quickly become frustrating and irritating when those knobs and buttons don't work right because of poor quality and reliability.

The knobs and switches on my 43 years old Minimoog D are still working flawlessly after all this time. That says a lot about the REAL high quality, robust components that Moog Music selected. Not the ALPS $1 worth, flimsy, crappy digital encoders and potentiometers that DSI (and other companies) use these days.
Minimoog D (vintage), OB6 (Desktop), Oberheim Matrix-6 (MIDI Controller), Prophet REV2-16, DeepMind 12, VC340

Razmo

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Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #22 on: May 29, 2018, 10:08:52 AM »
... in fact I could do without the user interface at all if that was an option.

That's ironic, because the fact that a synth has many knobs and buttons is the primary reason why people prefer them to software, including myself. For the gratifying and immediate hands-on experience. But that can quickly become frustrating and irritating when those knobs and buttons don't work right because of poor quality and reliability.

The knobs and switches on my 43 years old Minimoog D are still working flawlessly after all this time. That says a lot about the REAL high quality, robust components that Moog Music selected. Not the ALPS $1 worth, flimsy, crappy digital encoders and potentiometers that DSI (and other companies) use these days.

Mostly yes, but not all... the reason for me is that I do want the analog filters and oscillators, not digital ones... and if I control the device 100% via an editor on my computer, I really would not need anything else but a faceless hardware box ;) ... but then again... my needs are obviously pretty unique, on the bordering of crazy :D
If you need me, follow the shadows...

Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #23 on: May 29, 2018, 10:15:11 AM »
... in fact I could do without the user interface at all if that was an option.

That's ironic, because the fact that a synth has many knobs and buttons is the primary reason why people prefer them to software, including myself. For the gratifying and immediate hands-on experience. But that can quickly become frustrating and irritating when those knobs and buttons don't work right because of poor quality and reliability.

The knobs and switches on my 43 years old Minimoog D are still working flawlessly after all this time. That says a lot about the REAL high quality, robust components that Moog Music selected. Not the ALPS $1 worth, flimsy, crappy digital encoders and potentiometers that DSI (and other companies) use these days.

Mostly yes, but not all... the reason for me is that I do want the analog filters and oscillators, not digital ones... and if I control the device 100% via an editor on my computer, I really would not need anything else but a faceless hardware box ;) ... but then again... my needs are obviously pretty unique, on the bordering of crazy :D

Not at all. Everyone has different needs and preferences, and they're all perfectly valid and I respect that. If everybody wanted exactly the same things in life, it would be quite boring.  ;)
I just hope that we never go back to the mid to late eighties with synths having only one slider, or none at all !  >:(
Minimoog D (vintage), OB6 (Desktop), Oberheim Matrix-6 (MIDI Controller), Prophet REV2-16, DeepMind 12, VC340

Razmo

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Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #24 on: May 29, 2018, 10:16:23 AM »
... in fact I could do without the user interface at all if that was an option.

That's ironic, because the fact that a synth has many knobs and buttons is the primary reason why people prefer them to software, including myself. For the gratifying and immediate hands-on experience. But that can quickly become frustrating and irritating when those knobs and buttons don't work right because of poor quality and reliability.

The knobs and switches on my 43 years old Minimoog D are still working flawlessly after all this time. That says a lot about the REAL high quality, robust components that Moog Music selected. Not the ALPS $1 worth, flimsy, crappy digital encoders and potentiometers that DSI (and other companies) use these days.

Mostly yes, but not all... the reason for me is that I do want the analog filters and oscillators, not digital ones... and if I control the device 100% via an editor on my computer, I really would not need anything else but a faceless hardware box ;) ... but then again... my needs are obviously pretty unique, on the bordering of crazy :D

Not at all. Everyone has different needs and preferences, and they're all perfectly valid and I respect that. If everybody wanted exactly the same things in life, it would be quite boring.  ;)
I just hope that we never go back to the mid to late eighties with synths having only one slider, or none at all !  >:(

As long as they had 100% full SysEx, I would not complain.... maybe about their size, but otherwise not :D
If you need me, follow the shadows...

Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #25 on: May 30, 2018, 08:17:13 AM »
Early adopter here.  I use my REV2 multiple times a week, cart it to band practice at least once a week, and have used it for a few live shows in crazy environments.  At risk of jinxing myself, zero issues so far.  It's not my first DSI instrument, but I find myself inspired by it literally every time I turn it on and highly recommend it to anyone looking for a synth that can handle any requirement you want to throw at it.

..and no, I'm not sponsored in any way by DSI.  I pay full price just like everyone else. :D

Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #26 on: May 30, 2018, 11:47:16 AM »
I'm glad to see so many positive responses too. The REV 2 will be purchased soon :-)

Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #27 on: May 30, 2018, 12:33:46 PM »
I don't think it's necessary, but it would make sense to start a thread by the many Rev2 owners who have had no problems with their instruments and are happy with them, for the purpose of countering an exaggerated concern conjured up by this thread.
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Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #28 on: May 30, 2018, 02:20:32 PM »
I don't think it's necessary, but it would make sense to start a thread by the many Rev2 owners who have had no problems with their instruments and are happy with them, for the purpose of countering an exaggerated concern conjured up by this thread.
"Report Here If There's Nothing To Report"  ;D

Honestly I don't recall any major recent electronic instrument release that didn't have reports of issues--sometimes one-off hardware issues, sometimes minor firmware bugs, sometimes bad design. Generally most companies address the hardware and firmware issues quickly, whether it's DSI or other major players.

Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #29 on: May 30, 2018, 09:45:45 PM »
"Report Here If There's Nothing To Report"  ;D

Honestly I don't recall any major recent electronic instrument release that didn't have reports of issues--sometimes one-off hardware issues, sometimes minor firmware bugs, sometimes bad design. Generally most companies address the hardware and firmware issues quickly, whether it's DSI or other major players.

But it's true.  If there's nothing wrong, then there's nothing to report, and no one hears of all the cases in which all is well.  These forums can come back and bite a company.
"Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!"

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S Y Z Y G Y X

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Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #30 on: May 30, 2018, 10:58:02 PM »
Bottom line, the Rev2 is such an amazing synth that I keep finding myself bypassing my other synths for sounds and inspiration from it.  The bass sounds that I get from the Rev2 are much more round and fat than my Bass Station 2, hell even my Moog Subsequent 37.  The Rev2 is just so round and full of character compared to my other synthesizers, as well as never having had any of these problems I hear spoken of on these boards.  Just get one I have all faith in DSI, and all faith you too will be pleasantly surprised with this beast.
SEQUENTIAL Pro 3, DSI Prophet 12, DSI Prophet Rev2-8, Moog Subsequent 37, Roland Alpha Juno 2, Novation Bass Station 2, BOSS VE500, MOTU Micro Lite, AKAI APC240 MKII, SSL Fusion, UAD Apollo X6, MacBook Pro 2017, ADAM A7X Monitors, Logic X
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Razmo

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Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #31 on: May 31, 2018, 12:57:59 AM »
I for one, really LIKE threads where people present their complaints because how on earth would anybody be able to know about the bugs before buying, if no one complained? ... companies do not present a "current bugs to fix" list so that users can decide if it's for them... yes, there are many who are fine with their instrument, mainly because the bugs that may be present do NOT interfere with their workflow, but what is a hell's bug for one, could be a don't care bug for someone else.

so please... complain away, both because DSI will get a notice of it, and take it serious.. .yes it damages a company if a thread is filled with complaints, but it's their responsibility to address the complaints to settle the matters... if this did not happen, I certainly believe that a LOT of bugs would go unnoticed and decidedly unfixed.

I may be buying a Prophet X at some point... but if I would not be able to hear about other peoples views, even the negative ones, then I would potentially buy something I'd regret... I'm actually looking forward to hear what people would complain about regarding the X ...
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Gerry Havinga

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Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #32 on: May 31, 2018, 02:47:53 AM »
Bottom line, the Rev2 is such an amazing synth that I keep finding myself bypassing my other synths for sounds and inspiration from it.  The bass sounds that I get from the Rev2 are much more round and fat than my Bass Station 2, hell even my Moog Subsequent 37.  The Rev2 is just so round and full of character compared to my other synthesizers, as well as never having had any of these problems I hear spoken of on these boards.  Just get one I have all faith in DSI, and all faith you too will be pleasantly surprised with this beast.
Totally agree  :)

I knew about Dave as a "historically relevant" person being one of the inventors and instigators of the MIDI standard. It is no small feat to have several large and small companies and organizations agree upon standardization.

Till last year I didn't own any synths produced by him and his people. Now I own two .... The design and quality build of the Rev2 gave me great confidence in DSI. It was not very difficult to decide to buy a second hand Evolver as well (and upgrade it to the latest specs). The interesting thing is that combining the Evolver and a Digitone works really well. The old in with the new, very nice. As if the Evolver is ageless/timeless.

I am very seriously considering the Prophet X. Which is financially in a slightly different league from the Rev2  ;), to replace my aging Akai S5000 amongst other things. But I have no doubts about the build quality of the X and Dave's team architectural design of the electronics circuitry.
DAW-less and going down the Eurorack rabbit hole.

Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #33 on: May 31, 2018, 06:50:58 AM »
I for one, really LIKE threads where people present their complaints because how on earth would anybody be able to know about the bugs before buying, if no one complained? ... companies do not present a "current bugs to fix" list so that users can decide if it's for them... yes, there are many who are fine with their instrument, mainly because the bugs that may be present do NOT interfere with their workflow, but what is a hell's bug for one, could be a don't care bug for someone else.

I agree.  I'm constantly keeping an eye on the complaints about the Rev2.  I want to know exactly what state the instrument has reached before I buy one. 

The problem is, when the complaints about an instrument get over-stated and overly emotional, then potential buyers get a misrepresentation of the facts, and what may be a superb instrument that includes only a small number of bad units then appears to be a terrible instrument that includes only a small number of good units.  Hence, it's important for happy Rev2 owners to make their case in its favor. 

Let's remember that we often lllllllooooooove to complain about things that make us unhappy.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 06:58:20 AM by Sacred Synthesis »
"Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!"

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dslsynth

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Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #34 on: May 31, 2018, 07:14:30 AM »
The problem is, when the complaints about an instrument get over-stated and overly emotional, then potential buyers get a misrepresentation of the facts [...]

Exactly the reason why firmware bug lists should be public! ;)
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MKDVB

Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #35 on: June 05, 2018, 06:15:38 PM »
I'm new around these parts but you guys are way too nice to this whiner. My rev2 isn't perfect but this dude has no experience, good or bad, with DSI or the Rev2 yet is posting on the company's forum complaining via hearsay. Dude is whining vicariously  ... wonder how many 1-star yelp reviews this person's left for places he/she has never frequented?

Dollar for dollar, the Rev2 is one of the best modern analog polysynths.

 

Seq Pro 3| Moog Matriarch |  Elektron Monomachine mk2 | Roland V-Synth | Synthstrom Deluge | Squarp Pyramid

Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #36 on: June 05, 2018, 07:54:12 PM »
I have three DSI synths - a P-08, a P-12, and a Pro-2.  All of them have been great.  Well built, and totally bullet proof.  Back in the day, I had a P-5 Rev. 3.0.  It was also well made and very reliable.  The only thing that ever broke on it were the J-wires on the keyboard.  Would not hesitate to get another DSI product.

We live in a world of mass production.  Unfortunately, we as a society have gotten used to almost perfect production unit to unit.   But mass production often also means a mediocre product. 

My understanding is that the DSI synths are all hand made.  There is going to be more variance in the production standards in hand-made stuff.  Even then, the rate of imperfections seems pretty low from what I see here.  DSI stands behind their products.   So the few imperfections get resolved.

If you want perfect mass production, get a Casio.  If you want a really special instrument, get DSI.
Jim Thorburn .  Toys-  Dave Smith: Prophet 08;
Pro 2; Prophet 12; EastWest Orchestral soft synths; Yamaha S-90; Yamaha Montage 8, Yamaha DX-7; KARP Odyssey; Ensoniq ESQ-1.  All run through a Cubase DAW with a Tascam DM-24 board.

Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #37 on: June 05, 2018, 07:56:42 PM »
I'm new around these parts but you guys are way too nice to this whiner. My rev2 isn't perfect but this dude has no experience, good or bad, with DSI or the Rev2 yet is posting on the company's forum complaining via hearsay. Dude is whining vicariously  ... wonder how many 1-star yelp reviews this person's left for places he/she has never frequented?

We try to be patient, unless the whining gets out of hand, which it occasionally does.

I've owned DSI equipment since 2008 - about ten different items.  I've had only a few problems, but they were happily resolved.  I actually look forward to contacting DSI - usually Tracy - because it's always a pleasure.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2018, 08:01:57 PM by Sacred Synthesis »
"Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!"

- Henry David Thoreau

The Musical Synthesizer YouTube Channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChLGwGiRVs7rlZXnOG9_mUw

The Musical Synthesizer Blog: https://themusicalsynthesizer.wordpress.com

Razmo

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Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #38 on: June 06, 2018, 03:33:59 AM »
I have three DSI synths - a P-08, a P-12, and a Pro-2.  All of them have been great.  Well built, and totally bullet proof.  Back in the day, I had a P-5 Rev. 3.0.  It was also well made and very reliable.  The only thing that ever broke on it were the J-wires on the keyboard.  Would not hesitate to get another DSI product.

We live in a world of mass production.  Unfortunately, we as a society have gotten used to almost perfect production unit to unit.   But mass production often also means a mediocre product. 

My understanding is that the DSI synths are all hand made.  There is going to be more variance in the production standards in hand-made stuff.  Even then, the rate of imperfections seems pretty low from what I see here.  DSI stands behind their products.   So the few imperfections get resolved.

If you want perfect mass production, get a Casio.  If you want a really special instrument, get DSI.

Sorry to say, but DSI products ARE factory made, not hand made as far as I'm aware... they use a US factory, and can be seen on pictures, in the factory on quite a few pictures by now.
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MKDVB

Re: is choosing the Rev2 too risky?
« Reply #39 on: June 06, 2018, 07:40:46 AM »
I'm glad they're factory made as I wouldn't be able to afford one otherwise. When you think about the Rev2 being at the same price point as a Korg Prologue or even compared to the Behringer DM12, which was still a third cheaper per voice but without a 2nd OSC, menu-diving galore & a meh sound sans makeup ... it's amazing DSI is competing with these larger companies while still offering a higher quality product.
Seq Pro 3| Moog Matriarch |  Elektron Monomachine mk2 | Roland V-Synth | Synthstrom Deluge | Squarp Pyramid