Your Music

Re: Your Music
« Reply #340 on: October 25, 2018, 11:45:45 AM »
A melancholic mood:

Thanks, just what I needed! :)

Sorry about that.  I'll have to create some music one of these days that is giddy, fun, and light-hearted.  But it'll be like twisting myself into a pretzel!
"Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!"

- Henry David Thoreau

The Musical Synthesizer YouTube Channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChLGwGiRVs7rlZXnOG9_mUw

The Musical Synthesizer Blog: https://themusicalsynthesizer.wordpress.com

dslsynth

  • ***
  • 1036
Re: Your Music
« Reply #341 on: October 25, 2018, 11:52:23 AM »
Sorry about that.  I'll have to create some music one of these days that is giddy, fun, and light-hearted.  But it'll be like twisting myself into a pretzel!

Not to worry, my old friend. It was very good and worked well for my current mood. Thanks again! :)
#!/bin/sh
cp -f $0 $HOME/.signature

LoboLives

Re: Your Music
« Reply #342 on: October 25, 2018, 12:59:33 PM »

Re: Your Music
« Reply #343 on: October 25, 2018, 01:03:42 PM »
Thanks.
"Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!"

- Henry David Thoreau

The Musical Synthesizer YouTube Channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChLGwGiRVs7rlZXnOG9_mUw

The Musical Synthesizer Blog: https://themusicalsynthesizer.wordpress.com

LoboLives

Re: Your Music
« Reply #344 on: October 29, 2018, 10:41:00 PM »
He's Not Jason
He's Not Freddy
He's Real...

For my next installment I wanted to do something a bit more minimalist, and it doesn't get much more minimalist than Robert McNaughton's score for Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer.

McNaughton's score was done with a pretty basic setup

Roland Juno 106
Korg Polysix
Ensoniq Mirage Sampler

It's very percussion oriented with blasts of discordant synth stabs and off sounding arpeggiated metallic samples.

Instruments Used
Sequential Prophet-X Sampler (Heavy percussion hits, piano, whispering and screams)

Sequential Prophet-6 (A simple drone with a Phaser on it)

Enjoy!!!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mz0PjKCRtYw&t=12s

LoboLives

Re: Your Music
« Reply #345 on: October 30, 2018, 10:51:27 AM »
You are now in the deep end....of HORROR!

Richard Einhorn's score for Shock Waves is downright terrifying. Done entirely on both a MaxiKorg and MiniKorg and swamped in plate reverb gives a perfect atmosphere for this underwater Nazi zombie flick. In fact, I think it might have been the only score recorded with the MaxiKorg and MiniKorg ever.

Low synth drones, electronic bleeps almost mimicking the bleep of a sonar of a submarine. Lots of thunderous distorted synth blasts as well. Einhorn also used a recording of a crowed yelling "Zeig Heil" over and over as things become more intense. Oddly, I couldn't find a sample of this anywhere so I had to settle for a Hitler Speech off of Archive.org.

I couldn't help but also add a "Goosestep" patch to further add to the atmosphere. That was done with The L Train patch on the Sub 37. When you slow it down it gives a perfect militant march type sound.

The only synth used here was the Sub 37.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvrpPOlz9VE

Re: Your Music
« Reply #346 on: October 30, 2018, 05:34:58 PM »
I couldn't find a sample of this anywhere so I had to settle for a Hitler Speech...



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvrpPOlz9VE

Never words I thought I'd come across on the Sequential forum. Huh. Your dedication is impressive, credit due, but I'd encourage further efforts towards finding a sample from the film or faking your own foley etc. The whole "Hitler thing" is deeply uncool, to put it gently! I'm not familiar with the film you're paying tribute to, admittedly, so I don't know if there's a point I'm missing, but if you ever pay homage to the Wicker Man, say, I'll definitely give that a click.

Mods - if I'm out of line with this, I apologize, and I'll understand if you delete my reply here.

Gomjab

  • **
  • 110
Re: Your Music
« Reply #347 on: October 30, 2018, 08:07:24 PM »
Sacred Synthesis and LoboLives are definitely the Yin and Yang or Heaven and Hell of this thread. Their styles and themes are so different.  LoboLives, you must have grown up watching all those Saturday night horror flicks.  I didnít get to see your last one as YouTube pulled it. It is fun hearing such a diverse collection.  Being that it is bedtime here I think Iíll listen to some Sacred Synthesis as it is less likely to induce nightmares! ;)

LoboLives

Re: Your Music
« Reply #348 on: October 30, 2018, 08:21:10 PM »
I couldn't find a sample of this anywhere so I had to settle for a Hitler Speech...



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvrpPOlz9VE

Never words I thought I'd come across on the Sequential forum. Huh. Your dedication is impressive, credit due, but I'd encourage further efforts towards finding a sample from the film or faking your own foley etc. The whole "Hitler thing" is deeply uncool, to put it gently! I'm not familiar with the film you're paying tribute to, admittedly, so I don't know if there's a point I'm missing, but if you ever pay homage to the Wicker Man, say, I'll definitely give that a click.

Mods - if I'm out of line with this, I apologize, and I'll understand if you delete my reply here.

Well the video was flagged anyway lol

I donít think you are out of line at all, you simply are curious what a real life tragedy has to do with a synth video. The film Shock Waves is a 70s cult film staring Peter Cushing and John Carradine. It is about a group of people who are shipwrecked on an island and stumble upon a desolate SS battleship. They end up waking up the cargo, which in this case happens to be immortal underwater SS super soldiers. The whole movie is on YouTube as are itís trailers and the soundtrack just got remastered and released on vinyl.

Not much I can do about the origin of the underwater super soldiers Iím afraid. Even the opening title has a swastika on it and as I said the soundtrack does have a lot of Third Reich sound effects so I just take it as part of the film. Much like how I look at real life serial killer Henry Lee Lucas talking about killing his mother as part of the film Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer (video I posted before Shock Waves). It just comes with the territory with these types of films.

LoboLives

Re: Your Music
« Reply #349 on: October 30, 2018, 08:25:16 PM »
Sacred Synthesis and LoboLives are definitely the Yin and Yang or Heaven and Hell of this thread. Their styles and themes are so different.  LoboLives, you must have grown up watching all those Saturday night horror flicks.  I didnít get to see your last one as YouTube pulled it. It is fun hearing such a diverse collection.  Being that it is bedtime here I think Iíll listen to some Sacred Synthesis as it is less likely to induce nightmares! ;)

As it stands I have about 11 floor to ceiling shelves filled with Cult Films and about 8 racks of vinyl soundtracks. I think Iím the only person in this thread that has spent as much money on posters, Blu Rays, masks and horror memorabilia as I have on synths and guitars.

YouTube put the video back up but with a censorship warning stating the content could be considered offensive.

Re: Your Music
« Reply #350 on: October 30, 2018, 09:07:31 PM »
Sacred Synthesis and LoboLives are definitely the Yin and Yang or Heaven and Hell of this thread. Their styles and themes are so different.  LoboLives, you must have grown up watching all those Saturday night horror flicks.  I didn’t get to see your last one as YouTube pulled it. It is fun hearing such a diverse collection.  Being that it is bedtime here I think I’ll listen to some Sacred Synthesis as it is less likely to induce nightmares! ;)

Although I know this is said in jest, I'm quite happy to read it. 

Let me say something strange.  When I was about twenty years old, I spent a long late night trying as best I could to imitate to cries and moans of hell with synthesizers, reverb, and a large loud PA system.  Controversial for this forum, I realize, but so be it.  The effort was related to a very dark song I had written.  I dare say, I did as well as a synthesist could with the imitation.  Later that night - or morning, actually - I had an experience that scared the living daylights out of me.  Laugh if you want, but you weren't there. 

I have no doubt that evil can be attained through art.  If you give yourself to exceedingly dark music, you can arrive some place or meet something that you didn't intend to.  Sometimes intentions don't matter.  Hence, I will not approach exceedingly dark music, nor will I produce it.  Perhaps some of my music could be forced into such a category, but it just isn't the case.  I would admit that I'm inclined towards the somber and introspective; that's an admission of a personality.  Sad?  Yes, at times.  But dark?  No, never. 

It's only one opinion on a synthesizer forum, and you can all laugh at the religious fanatic.  Regardless, I would warn anyone and everyone to beware of exceedingly dark music.
« Last Edit: October 30, 2018, 09:18:31 PM by Sacred Synthesis »
"Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!"

- Henry David Thoreau

The Musical Synthesizer YouTube Channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChLGwGiRVs7rlZXnOG9_mUw

The Musical Synthesizer Blog: https://themusicalsynthesizer.wordpress.com

LoboLives

Re: Your Music
« Reply #351 on: October 30, 2018, 10:29:59 PM »
Sacred Synthesis and LoboLives are definitely the Yin and Yang or Heaven and Hell of this thread. Their styles and themes are so different.  LoboLives, you must have grown up watching all those Saturday night horror flicks.  I didnít get to see your last one as YouTube pulled it. It is fun hearing such a diverse collection.  Being that it is bedtime here I think Iíll listen to some Sacred Synthesis as it is less likely to induce nightmares! ;)

Although I know this is said in jest, I'm quite happy to read it. 

Let me say something strange.  When I was about twenty years old, I spent a long late night trying as best I could to imitate to cries and moans of hell with synthesizers, reverb, and a large loud PA system.  Controversial for this forum, I realize, but so be it.  The effort was related to a very dark song I had written.  I dare say, I did as well as a synthesist could with the imitation.  Later that night - or morning, actually - I had an experience that scared the living daylights out of me.  Laugh if you want, but you weren't there. 

I have no doubt that evil can be attained through art.  If you give yourself to exceedingly dark music, you can arrive some place or meet something that you didn't intend to.  Sometimes intentions don't matter.  Hence, I will not approach exceedingly dark music, nor will I produce it.  Perhaps some of my music could be forced into such a category, but it just isn't the case.  I would admit that I'm inclined towards the somber and introspective; that's an admission of a personality.  Sad?  Yes, at times.  But dark?  No, never. 

It's only one opinion on a synthesizer forum, and you can all laugh at the religious fanatic.  Regardless, I would warn anyone and everyone to beware of exceedingly dark music.

Thatís awesome! You know it would be somewhat of a cool concept to do a Sounds Of Heaven/Sounds Of Hell EP. Iím totally down to do a collaboration.

Re: Your Music
« Reply #352 on: October 31, 2018, 03:12:45 AM »
I couldn't find a sample of this anywhere so I had to settle for a Hitler Speech...



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvrpPOlz9VE

Never words I thought I'd come across on the Sequential forum. Huh. Your dedication is impressive, credit due, but I'd encourage further efforts towards finding a sample from the film or faking your own foley etc. The whole "Hitler thing" is deeply uncool, to put it gently! I'm not familiar with the film you're paying tribute to, admittedly, so I don't know if there's a point I'm missing, but if you ever pay homage to the Wicker Man, say, I'll definitely give that a click.

Mods - if I'm out of line with this, I apologize, and I'll understand if you delete my reply here.

Well the video was flagged anyway lol

I donít think you are out of line at all, you simply are curious what a real life tragedy has to do with a synth video. The film Shock Waves is a 70s cult film staring Peter Cushing and John Carradine. It is about a group of people who are shipwrecked on an island and stumble upon a desolate SS battleship. They end up waking up the cargo, which in this case happens to be immortal underwater SS super soldiers. The whole movie is on YouTube as are itís trailers and the soundtrack just got remastered and released on vinyl.

Not much I can do about the origin of the underwater super soldiers Iím afraid. Even the opening title has a swastika on it and as I said the soundtrack does have a lot of Third Reich sound effects so I just take it as part of the film. Much like how I look at real life serial killer Henry Lee Lucas talking about killing his mother as part of the film Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer (video I posted before Shock Waves). It just comes with the territory with these types of films.


Like I said, I've not seen the film, but I'm sure it's a fine piece of schlock. I'm a pretty broad-minded film freak, and often come home from the video store with about 5 or 6 titles in hand, anything from Maya Deren to  Wes Craven. It was probably one (or more!) of your posts that prompted a weeks-long John Carpenter binge (He's my ex-cousin-in-law, innit!). But yeah - touching on something Sacred Tim said, there's a certain darkness out there/within that's very real - our culture lives through it again and again and we're doing a "tremendous" job with it on the planet at this very moment in time. I'd never (rarely, anyway!) wish to censor someone else's voice/opinion, but I felt (and still feel) that putting actual audio from a Hitler speech out into the world right now isn't on. Maybe if it was used to illustrate a powerful point, or to inspire a moment of consideration and compassion... but otherwise, it's gratuitous and a reminder of real-life horror.

(I'm just back to Berlin after two months away, very jet-lagged, and perhaps edgier and more sensitive than usual. There are 4 Stolpersteine on the doorstep of my apartment building, commemorating the people who once lived here, maybe in this very flat. It's easy to spend my time surrounded by synths and cranking out ABBA or Amon Duul while the kettle boils, but sometimes the human darkness of the world we share hits hard.)

Uh - sorry to belabor this! I'll post a jaunty synthpop tune soon to make it up to y'all!

LoboLives

Re: Your Music
« Reply #353 on: October 31, 2018, 07:03:35 AM »
I couldn't find a sample of this anywhere so I had to settle for a Hitler Speech...



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvrpPOlz9VE

Never words I thought I'd come across on the Sequential forum. Huh. Your dedication is impressive, credit due, but I'd encourage further efforts towards finding a sample from the film or faking your own foley etc. The whole "Hitler thing" is deeply uncool, to put it gently! I'm not familiar with the film you're paying tribute to, admittedly, so I don't know if there's a point I'm missing, but if you ever pay homage to the Wicker Man, say, I'll definitely give that a click.

Mods - if I'm out of line with this, I apologize, and I'll understand if you delete my reply here.

Well the video was flagged anyway lol

I donít think you are out of line at all, you simply are curious what a real life tragedy has to do with a synth video. The film Shock Waves is a 70s cult film staring Peter Cushing and John Carradine. It is about a group of people who are shipwrecked on an island and stumble upon a desolate SS battleship. They end up waking up the cargo, which in this case happens to be immortal underwater SS super soldiers. The whole movie is on YouTube as are itís trailers and the soundtrack just got remastered and released on vinyl.

Not much I can do about the origin of the underwater super soldiers Iím afraid. Even the opening title has a swastika on it and as I said the soundtrack does have a lot of Third Reich sound effects so I just take it as part of the film. Much like how I look at real life serial killer Henry Lee Lucas talking about killing his mother as part of the film Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer (video I posted before Shock Waves). It just comes with the territory with these types of films.


Like I said, I've not seen the film, but I'm sure it's a fine piece of schlock. I'm a pretty broad-minded film freak, and often come home from the video store with about 5 or 6 titles in hand, anything from Maya Deren to  Wes Craven. It was probably one (or more!) of your posts that prompted a weeks-long John Carpenter binge (He's my ex-cousin-in-law, innit!). But yeah - touching on something Sacred Tim said, there's a certain darkness out there/within that's very real - our culture lives through it again and again and we're doing a "tremendous" job with it on the planet at this very moment in time. I'd never (rarely, anyway!) wish to censor someone else's voice/opinion, but I felt (and still feel) that putting actual audio from a Hitler speech out into the world right now isn't on. Maybe if it was used to illustrate a powerful point, or to inspire a moment of consideration and compassion... but otherwise, it's gratuitous and a reminder of real-life horror.

(I'm just back to Berlin after two months away, very jet-lagged, and perhaps edgier and more sensitive than usual. There are 4 Stolpersteine on the doorstep of my apartment building, commemorating the people who once lived here, maybe in this very flat. It's easy to spend my time surrounded by synths and cranking out ABBA or Amon Duul while the kettle boils, but sometimes the human darkness of the world we share hits hard.)

Uh - sorry to belabor this! I'll post a jaunty synthpop tune soon to make it up to y'all!

I certainly sympathize and understand why people would be offended but Iíve always stood by the mentality that people shouldnít have to change their personal interests simply because someone else is offended by them. Really the whole point of an exploitation film is to take a subject, be it war, sex, counter culture, death, revenge, religion, or race and make it so over the top to the level of cartoonish proportions. Perhaps in some way itís a nice coping mechanism or somewhat cathartic? Iím not sure. Iím also a filmmaker and growing up with exploitation films they are likely going to be a big influence to my work. I canít worry about someone being offended by a film that happens to have nazis anymore than I can be concerned that someone else is offended by a film with a murderous nun. Life is too short.

Re: Your Music
« Reply #354 on: October 31, 2018, 07:46:37 AM »
I couldn't find a sample of this anywhere so I had to settle for a Hitler Speech...



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvrpPOlz9VE

Never words I thought I'd come across on the Sequential forum. Huh. Your dedication is impressive, credit due, but I'd encourage further efforts towards finding a sample from the film or faking your own foley etc. The whole "Hitler thing" is deeply uncool, to put it gently! I'm not familiar with the film you're paying tribute to, admittedly, so I don't know if there's a point I'm missing, but if you ever pay homage to the Wicker Man, say, I'll definitely give that a click.

Mods - if I'm out of line with this, I apologize, and I'll understand if you delete my reply here.

Well the video was flagged anyway lol

I donít think you are out of line at all, you simply are curious what a real life tragedy has to do with a synth video. The film Shock Waves is a 70s cult film staring Peter Cushing and John Carradine. It is about a group of people who are shipwrecked on an island and stumble upon a desolate SS battleship. They end up waking up the cargo, which in this case happens to be immortal underwater SS super soldiers. The whole movie is on YouTube as are itís trailers and the soundtrack just got remastered and released on vinyl.

Not much I can do about the origin of the underwater super soldiers Iím afraid. Even the opening title has a swastika on it and as I said the soundtrack does have a lot of Third Reich sound effects so I just take it as part of the film. Much like how I look at real life serial killer Henry Lee Lucas talking about killing his mother as part of the film Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer (video I posted before Shock Waves). It just comes with the territory with these types of films.


Like I said, I've not seen the film, but I'm sure it's a fine piece of schlock. I'm a pretty broad-minded film freak, and often come home from the video store with about 5 or 6 titles in hand, anything from Maya Deren to  Wes Craven. It was probably one (or more!) of your posts that prompted a weeks-long John Carpenter binge (He's my ex-cousin-in-law, innit!). But yeah - touching on something Sacred Tim said, there's a certain darkness out there/within that's very real - our culture lives through it again and again and we're doing a "tremendous" job with it on the planet at this very moment in time. I'd never (rarely, anyway!) wish to censor someone else's voice/opinion, but I felt (and still feel) that putting actual audio from a Hitler speech out into the world right now isn't on. Maybe if it was used to illustrate a powerful point, or to inspire a moment of consideration and compassion... but otherwise, it's gratuitous and a reminder of real-life horror.

(I'm just back to Berlin after two months away, very jet-lagged, and perhaps edgier and more sensitive than usual. There are 4 Stolpersteine on the doorstep of my apartment building, commemorating the people who once lived here, maybe in this very flat. It's easy to spend my time surrounded by synths and cranking out ABBA or Amon Duul while the kettle boils, but sometimes the human darkness of the world we share hits hard.)

Uh - sorry to belabor this! I'll post a jaunty synthpop tune soon to make it up to y'all!

I certainly sympathize and understand why people would be offended but Iíve always stood by the mentality that people shouldnít have to change their personal interests simply because someone else is offended by them. Really the whole point of an exploitation film is to take a subject, be it war, sex, counter culture, death, revenge, religion, or race and make it so over the top to the level of cartoonish proportions. Perhaps in some way itís a nice coping mechanism or somewhat cathartic? Iím not sure. Iím also a filmmaker and growing up with exploitation films they are likely going to be a big influence to my work. I canít worry about someone being offended by a film that happens to have nazis anymore than I can be concerned that someone else is offended by a film with a murderous nun. Life is too short.

To be clear, I'm not offended by the idea behind the film in any way, or you paying homage to it, or to the exploitation genre. We use films and music and art in general sometimes to examine our culture at its worst, or to face our collective fears from the safety of the screen, etc. I dig how deep into film-making/soundtrack work you are. My issue is with the direct use of material from a Hitler rally. "I couldn't find a sample of this anywhere so I had to settle for a Hitler Speech..." is what I find objectionable. Considering you're doing a cover here, I'm not sure I understand the artistic merit in using something so genuinely horrific.

LoboLives

Re: Your Music
« Reply #355 on: October 31, 2018, 08:10:58 AM »
I couldn't find a sample of this anywhere so I had to settle for a Hitler Speech...



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvrpPOlz9VE

Never words I thought I'd come across on the Sequential forum. Huh. Your dedication is impressive, credit due, but I'd encourage further efforts towards finding a sample from the film or faking your own foley etc. The whole "Hitler thing" is deeply uncool, to put it gently! I'm not familiar with the film you're paying tribute to, admittedly, so I don't know if there's a point I'm missing, but if you ever pay homage to the Wicker Man, say, I'll definitely give that a click.

Mods - if I'm out of line with this, I apologize, and I'll understand if you delete my reply here.

Well the video was flagged anyway lol

I donít think you are out of line at all, you simply are curious what a real life tragedy has to do with a synth video. The film Shock Waves is a 70s cult film staring Peter Cushing and John Carradine. It is about a group of people who are shipwrecked on an island and stumble upon a desolate SS battleship. They end up waking up the cargo, which in this case happens to be immortal underwater SS super soldiers. The whole movie is on YouTube as are itís trailers and the soundtrack just got remastered and released on vinyl.

Not much I can do about the origin of the underwater super soldiers Iím afraid. Even the opening title has a swastika on it and as I said the soundtrack does have a lot of Third Reich sound effects so I just take it as part of the film. Much like how I look at real life serial killer Henry Lee Lucas talking about killing his mother as part of the film Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer (video I posted before Shock Waves). It just comes with the territory with these types of films.


Like I said, I've not seen the film, but I'm sure it's a fine piece of schlock. I'm a pretty broad-minded film freak, and often come home from the video store with about 5 or 6 titles in hand, anything from Maya Deren to  Wes Craven. It was probably one (or more!) of your posts that prompted a weeks-long John Carpenter binge (He's my ex-cousin-in-law, innit!). But yeah - touching on something Sacred Tim said, there's a certain darkness out there/within that's very real - our culture lives through it again and again and we're doing a "tremendous" job with it on the planet at this very moment in time. I'd never (rarely, anyway!) wish to censor someone else's voice/opinion, but I felt (and still feel) that putting actual audio from a Hitler speech out into the world right now isn't on. Maybe if it was used to illustrate a powerful point, or to inspire a moment of consideration and compassion... but otherwise, it's gratuitous and a reminder of real-life horror.

(I'm just back to Berlin after two months away, very jet-lagged, and perhaps edgier and more sensitive than usual. There are 4 Stolpersteine on the doorstep of my apartment building, commemorating the people who once lived here, maybe in this very flat. It's easy to spend my time surrounded by synths and cranking out ABBA or Amon Duul while the kettle boils, but sometimes the human darkness of the world we share hits hard.)

Uh - sorry to belabor this! I'll post a jaunty synthpop tune soon to make it up to y'all!

I certainly sympathize and understand why people would be offended but Iíve always stood by the mentality that people shouldnít have to change their personal interests simply because someone else is offended by them. Really the whole point of an exploitation film is to take a subject, be it war, sex, counter culture, death, revenge, religion, or race and make it so over the top to the level of cartoonish proportions. Perhaps in some way itís a nice coping mechanism or somewhat cathartic? Iím not sure. Iím also a filmmaker and growing up with exploitation films they are likely going to be a big influence to my work. I canít worry about someone being offended by a film that happens to have nazis anymore than I can be concerned that someone else is offended by a film with a murderous nun. Life is too short.

To be clear, I'm not offended by the idea behind the film in any way, or you paying homage to it, or to the exploitation genre. We use films and music and art in general sometimes to examine our culture at its worst, or to face our collective fears from the safety of the screen, etc. I dig how deep into film-making/soundtrack work you are. My issue is with the direct use of material from a Hitler rally. "I couldn't find a sample of this anywhere so I had to settle for a Hitler Speech..." is what I find objectionable. Considering you're doing a cover here, I'm not sure I understand the artistic merit in using something so genuinely horrific.

Because the soundtrack is littered with sound effects and samples from the SS. I figured it would fit just as well as the Zeig Heil sample. I didnít want to be going around looking for this specific sample or asking around for this specific sample as it would eat up too much time. It was the only audio sample I could find that somewhat fit and since it was off of the public domain archive, I could use it freely. It is appropriate in the context of the filmís plot and was used as an effect to create unease and judging by everyoneís reaction, it was successful.

Gomjab

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  • 110
Re: Your Music
« Reply #356 on: October 31, 2018, 06:36:08 PM »
Happy Halloween LoboLives.  Iím sure you made some ghoulish tunes today.

Gomjab

  • **
  • 110
Re: Your Mu
« Reply #357 on: October 31, 2018, 06:56:41 PM »
Sacred Synthesis and LoboLives are definitely the Yin and Yang or Heaven and Hell of this thread. Their styles and themes are so different.  LoboLives, you must have grown up watching all those Saturday night horror flicks.  I didnít get to see your last one as YouTube pulled it. It is fun hearing such a diverse collection.  Being that it is bedtime here I think Iíll listen to some Sacred Synthesis as it is less likely to induce nightmares! ;)

Although I know this is said in jest, I'm quite happy to read it. 

Let me say something strange.  When I was about twenty years old, I spent a long late night trying as best I could to imitate to cries and moans of hell with synthesizers, reverb, and a large loud PA system.  Controversial for this forum, I realize, but so be it.  The effort was related to a very dark song I had written.  I dare say, I did as well as a synthesist could with the imitation.  Later that night - or morning, actually - I had an experience that scared the living daylights out of me.  Laugh if you want, but you weren't there. 

I have no doubt that evil can be attained through art.  If you give yourself to exceedingly dark music, you can arrive some place or meet something that you didn't intend to.  Sometimes intentions don't matter.  Hence, I will not approach exceedingly dark music, nor will I produce it.  Perhaps some of my music could be forced into such a category, but it just isn't the case.  I would admit that I'm inclined towards the somber and introspective; that's an admission of a personality.  Sad?  Yes, at times.  But dark?  No, never. 

It's only one opinion on a synthesizer forum, and you can all laugh at the religious fanatic.  Regardless, I would warn anyone and everyone to beware of exceedingly dark music.

Yes my post was in jest but like most humor it was grounded in some truth.  I donít consider LoboLive evil but he wears his taste in the horror film genre on his sleeve in this thread.  As your music here I find beautiful and calming. They do make an interesting contrast.  And I enjoy hearing both.

I do agree that music is a very powerful medium that can definitely tug at your heart and soul. Those great soundtracks are so effective cause they create that emotion in you to fit the scene on the screen.  I think in the future, those studying great music will often look back at the things created to accompany a movie as the great works of our era. Like some music Bach created to be played as lite entertainment for some social parties of the aristocracy.

LoboLives

Re: Your Music
« Reply #358 on: October 31, 2018, 08:06:30 PM »
Happy Halloween LoboLives.  Iím sure you made some ghoulish tunes today.

Thanks!
Actually I was at auditions with my producer all day for a film Iím directing. Iíll be in the studio tomorrow though. :)

LoboLives

Re: Your Mu
« Reply #359 on: October 31, 2018, 08:24:18 PM »
Sacred Synthesis and LoboLives are definitely the Yin and Yang or Heaven and Hell of this thread. Their styles and themes are so different.  LoboLives, you must have grown up watching all those Saturday night horror flicks.  I didnít get to see your last one as YouTube pulled it. It is fun hearing such a diverse collection.  Being that it is bedtime here I think Iíll listen to some Sacred Synthesis as it is less likely to induce nightmares! ;)

Although I know this is said in jest, I'm quite happy to read it. 

Let me say something strange.  When I was about twenty years old, I spent a long late night trying as best I could to imitate to cries and moans of hell with synthesizers, reverb, and a large loud PA system.  Controversial for this forum, I realize, but so be it.  The effort was related to a very dark song I had written.  I dare say, I did as well as a synthesist could with the imitation.  Later that night - or morning, actually - I had an experience that scared the living daylights out of me.  Laugh if you want, but you weren't there. 

I have no doubt that evil can be attained through art.  If you give yourself to exceedingly dark music, you can arrive some place or meet something that you didn't intend to.  Sometimes intentions don't matter.  Hence, I will not approach exceedingly dark music, nor will I produce it.  Perhaps some of my music could be forced into such a category, but it just isn't the case.  I would admit that I'm inclined towards the somber and introspective; that's an admission of a personality.  Sad?  Yes, at times.  But dark?  No, never. 

It's only one opinion on a synthesizer forum, and you can all laugh at the religious fanatic.  Regardless, I would warn anyone and everyone to beware of exceedingly dark music.

Yes my post was in jest but like most humor it was grounded in some truth.  I donít consider LoboLive evil but he wears his taste in the horror film genre on his sleeve in this thread.  As your music here I find beautiful and calming. They do make an interesting contrast.  And I enjoy hearing both.

I do agree that music is a very powerful medium that can definitely tug at your heart and soul. Those great soundtracks are so effective cause they create that emotion in you to fit the scene on the screen.  I think in the future, those studying great music will often look back at the things created to accompany a movie as the great works of our era. Like some music Bach created to be played as lite entertainment for some social parties of the aristocracy.

I was watching an interview with composer Christopher Young and he said a lot of conservatories looked down on film music for many years (considering it rushed, sloppy and commercial) and it wasnít until composers like Jerry Goldsmith and Ennio Morricone started to branch out into other styles and incorporate different genres into their classical pieces that more and more conservatories started to change their view. Iíve always considered soundtrack music to be the most pure form of music because itís rarely written for a specific listening audience. Itís simply there to accompany a mosaic of images. Remove those images and suddenly the music becomes its own thing and can sometimes be taken completely out of context.

I remeber playing a Riz Ortolani piece once at work and this older woman who was really into classical music came up to me and said that was one of the most beautiful pieces of music sheís heard. The music? The opening theme to the film Cannibal Holocaust. A film banned in numerous countries for its content. Go figure lol