The Official Sequential/DSI Forum

REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)

dsetto

  • ***
  • 387
Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #100 on: January 20, 2017, 06:03:49 PM »
Thank you, DSI, for 16 voices, bi-timbrality, programmability, & streamlined workflow. As a performing keyboardist, piano player, and sound designer, this fits my bill nicely.

dsetto

  • ***
  • 387
Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #101 on: January 20, 2017, 06:10:20 PM »
The "classic" branding of Rev 1's a collector's reason to keep it. Rev 2 has a biblical allusion, btw. Maybe, a tip of the hat to the ethereal dual P '08 proponent. ... And, while conjuring, maybe a limited release, dual tier awaits, one day. Along with the 4-part timbrality. But back to '17.

dsetto

  • ***
  • 387
Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #102 on: January 20, 2017, 06:15:35 PM »
I really don't like making suggestions for an unreleased instrument, but, I wonder if we could convince DSI to add a Juno 60 style HPF as a digital effect, that would be super useful imho. :)


I both agree with the sentiment, AND, I support the proposal. It sounds like it's in the realm of feasibity on this instrument.

dsetto

  • ***
  • 387
Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #103 on: January 20, 2017, 06:18:17 PM »
Has anyone heard if:

- Effects can be true-bypassed?
- if distortion is analog?

Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #104 on: January 20, 2017, 07:11:19 PM »
Maybe, a tip of the hat to the ethereal dual P '08 proponent.

?
"Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!"

- Henry David Thoreau

The Musical Synthesizer YouTube Channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChLGwGiRVs7rlZXnOG9_mUw

The Musical Synthesizer Blog: https://themusicalsynthesizer.wordpress.com

Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #105 on: January 20, 2017, 07:23:01 PM »
I really don't like making suggestions for an unreleased instrument, but, I wonder if we could convince DSI to add a Juno 60 style HPF as a digital effect, that would be super useful imho. :)


I both agree with the sentiment, AND, I support the proposal. It sounds like it's in the realm of feasibity on this instrument.

The absence of a high pass filter is the most outstanding omission from the Prophet '08/REV2 voice architecture that keeps it from being an ideal analog design.  I would strongly support its addition.  The problem is, the philosophy of the instrument is that it require minimal menu diving and that each function have its own parameter.    Adding a HPF to the effects menu would contradict this and make it appear very much as an afterthought.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2017, 07:24:45 PM by Sacred Synthesis »
"Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!"

- Henry David Thoreau

The Musical Synthesizer YouTube Channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChLGwGiRVs7rlZXnOG9_mUw

The Musical Synthesizer Blog: https://themusicalsynthesizer.wordpress.com

Shaw

  • ***
  • 1111
Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #106 on: January 20, 2017, 07:38:26 PM »
Adding a HPF to the effects menu would contradict this and make it appear very much as an afterthought.
Since it's not currently on the synth, it IS an afterthought...  :)
"Classical musicians go to the conservatories, rock´n roll musicians go to the garages." --- Frank Zappa

Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #107 on: January 20, 2017, 08:31:40 PM »
Right, wise guy.  ;D  The key word is "appear."  My point is, there doesn't appear to be a way to smoothly work a high pass filter into the REV2 without contradicting the instrument's design philosophy.  What's needed is another knob, and the opportunity for adding one is past.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2017, 08:57:53 PM by Sacred Synthesis »
"Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!"

- Henry David Thoreau

The Musical Synthesizer YouTube Channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChLGwGiRVs7rlZXnOG9_mUw

The Musical Synthesizer Blog: https://themusicalsynthesizer.wordpress.com

chysn

  • *****
  • 1454
Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #108 on: January 20, 2017, 09:08:06 PM »
The only thing I don't like about the REV2 name (besides the font) is that it suggests it will be the one and only revision of a DSI synthesizer.  I wish it had been qualified as the Prophet Rev2.

A name won't stop them from doing that in the future, if they really want to. There's always "Tempest Mark 2" or "Evolver II" or "Mopho: The Revenge" or any of a million ways to name sequels.
Pro 3 #1640
macOS, Ableton, MuseScore2, Serum, Pianoteq, OPS7
www.wav2pro3.comwww.soundcloud.com/beige-mazewww.github.com/chysnwww.beigemaze.com

Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #109 on: January 20, 2017, 09:11:39 PM »
True.  It just hints to me that this is the one exception.  But again, it isn't a revision in the Prophet 5 sense of the word.  The REV2 is a Prophet '08 Mk II.  That's much more exciting.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2017, 10:09:25 PM by Sacred Synthesis »
"Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!"

- Henry David Thoreau

The Musical Synthesizer YouTube Channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChLGwGiRVs7rlZXnOG9_mUw

The Musical Synthesizer Blog: https://themusicalsynthesizer.wordpress.com

LoboLives

Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #110 on: January 21, 2017, 05:29:26 AM »
I just wish you could have more than one split.

Well yes. I hate to be negative with such a wonderful instrument. But if we could use the 16 voices with four different programs instead of two, then I think I could be quite happy with a single Rev2, with no need for a secondary module.

But having said that, there are so many other things to be thankful for with the Rev2. I'm very happy to see more memory banks and what sounds like better presets. I love that there's a sub, which I enjoy on my Tetra. (That can really add a lot to the warmth and thickness of a sound.) I'm encouraged at the suggestion that there's a new keybed and hope that it is indeed superior to the old one. Additionally, one of my biggest concerns with a replacement for the '08 was the idea of having to start all over again with programming. The countless hours that we have into programming the '08 are now going to continue to pay off with the Rev2, and that makes me very happy indeed.

Yeah, there's a lot of great things about the synth. I'm not sold on it personally. It looks great on paper with an insanely economical price but I need to give it some time. I think my biggest issue is, if they were going to offer two versions...why not differentiate them more. I think 16 voices is overkill like I mentioned before...but I could justify it if you could do more with the higher priced synth instead of just having more voices. Make one for the bedroom musician and make one for the "professional".

Plus now that DSI has proven that can do a synth at this price point...there really shouldn't be an excuse to do a price increase with their next one which hopefully won't just be what is essentially Tweaking an established product as opposed to moving forward with a totally new one.

Out of curiosity, what reservations do you have? Just that's it's 16? There is a 8 voice version too. Trying to soak up as much as I can about DSI synths. My experience with DSI is limited to P6/OB6.

I can't exactly put my finger on it. I guess because essentially it's just taking an established synth and just correcting a few flaws of the P08 ( horrible sequencer, lack of oscillator slop, convoluted layout). It's not really a step forward, it's just a step back to clean a few things up.

I feel, especially since they are going to release two versions of the Rev2 why just make the only difference polyphony especially if you aren't going to utilize said polyphony in a different way? You get the exact same features. Why not include a duplicate engine inside (especially if they are going to be a different price points anyway) and have the ability to have 4 patches going simultaneously each with their own sequencer and effects (Similar but not exactly like the Sequential Circuits Multi-Trak). You can set them in different ways and also have the ability to mute specific patches or have the sequencers run in "stand alone mode" for each individual engine to give a more interactive feel.

In addition to the features that exist on the Rev2:

1.) Have 4 different zones across the keyboard (For example, a low bass sequence, a brass patch and string patch in the middle and lead patch on the higher register)

2.) Have 3 zones in which two patches are layered and two are separate.

3.) Have the ability to "detach" Engines from the keyboard so only the sequences are playing. For example have three engines in "Stand alone Mode" playing their respective sequences while you play a lead line on the keyboard over top with the remaining fourth engine (I think this is a good idea, especially if you are utilizing the pitch wheel so that way it's not altering the pitch of the other sequences)

So you have 16 voice polyphony but it's utilized better. You could call it...the Sequential (No reason not to continue to use the name) Prophetx4 much like the Mophox4 as you have 4 individual four voice engines under a single roof.

So you have two completely different synthesizers that could have been released: A "P8:Rev2" which is what we see now and a "Prophetx4". The P8:Rev2 is catered to the bedroom musician and the Prophetx4 is catered to the higher end crowd.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2017, 05:33:16 AM by LoboLives »

Shaw

  • ***
  • 1111
Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #111 on: January 21, 2017, 06:40:17 AM »
Right, wise guy.  ;D  The key word is "appear."  My point is, there doesn't appear to be a way to smoothly work a high pass filter into the REV2 without contradicting the instrument's design philosophy.  What's needed is another knob, and the opportunity for adding one is past.
+1 for the HPF (especially since you can do layers)... I was just being a smart ass.  But seriously though, I would take a HPF in the effects section... afterthought or not.
"Classical musicians go to the conservatories, rock´n roll musicians go to the garages." --- Frank Zappa

Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #112 on: January 21, 2017, 07:33:20 AM »
I've decided to keep my Prophet 08 because, frankly, I'm happy enough as is.

I don't know if this is the appropriate place to post this, but what outboard FX units would be the rough equivalents of whatever is being added to the REV2?  Every distortion I've tried, for instance, has been far too harsh and unsubtle for my Prophet.  Also, what could approximate the bucket delay?

Shaw

  • ***
  • 1111
Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #113 on: January 21, 2017, 08:39:09 AM »
...what outboard FX units would be the rough equivalents of whatever is being added to the REV2?  Every distortion I've tried, for instance, has been far too harsh and unsubtle for my Prophet.
The best Eventide box you can afford. An H9 pedal, Eventide Eclipse, or an Eventide Harmonizer.
"Classical musicians go to the conservatories, rock´n roll musicians go to the garages." --- Frank Zappa

LoboLives

Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #114 on: January 21, 2017, 09:08:37 AM »
...what outboard FX units would be the rough equivalents of whatever is being added to the REV2?  Every distortion I've tried, for instance, has been far too harsh and unsubtle for my Prophet.
The best Eventide box you can afford. An H9 pedal, Eventide Eclipse, or an Eventide Harmonizer.

I was about to say. Synthesizers+Eventide effects=Perfection. Lexicon being a close second.

Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #115 on: January 21, 2017, 09:37:43 AM »
I own an Eventide Space for reverb, could not agree more.  I plan on buying a Line 6 M5 for various chorus/flanger options.

However, I don't think Eventide has a dedicated distortion beyond their H9 unit.  I own a Proco Rat 2 for my bass guitar, but even the slightest touch of distortion from that is overbearing on a synth.  What's a more nuanced and subtle option?
« Last Edit: January 21, 2017, 09:39:57 AM by Benji »

Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #116 on: January 21, 2017, 10:10:20 AM »
I've decided to keep my Prophet 08 because, frankly, I'm happy enough as is.

I don't know if this is the appropriate place to post this, but what outboard FX units would be the rough equivalents of whatever is being added to the REV2?  Every distortion I've tried, for instance, has been far too harsh and unsubtle for my Prophet.  Also, what could approximate the bucket delay?

For recording, I use the on board effects in my DAW.  For live, I would suggest a Lexicon MX200 or MX 300.  Both have great reviews on this site.  I just got an MX200, and haven't had a chance to actually use it live, but it seems like it will do very well.

Distortion - I used to use an Ibanez Tube Screamer on my P-05.  It has a great range from subtle to harsh. Most of the time, the old recordings you hear with a P-05 being distorted, it was done with a Tube Screamer. It was standard of the industry back then.  However, it is only mono.  So, if you plan to use it on the P-08 stereo out, you will need to run the P-08 through a mixer which has at least one effects send - ideally one for the MX200 and one for the Tube Screamer.  That way you can get the distortion on both channels of the P-08.  I would avoid mixing the Tube Screamer and the MX 200 on the same effects channel if possible. 
« Last Edit: January 21, 2017, 10:21:50 AM by jdt9517 »
Jim Thorburn .  Toys-  Dave Smith: Prophet 08;
Pro 2; Prophet 12; EastWest Orchestral soft synths; Yamaha S-90; Yamaha Montage 8, Yamaha DX-7; KARP Odyssey; Ensoniq ESQ-1.  All run through a Cubase DAW with a Tascam DM-24 board.

Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #117 on: January 21, 2017, 10:17:14 AM »

If I attached a vid to a song (used in some soundtracks), would you be able to ear-approximate if the P '08 touches close to the droning bass and arp'd sequence?
https://youtu.be/dOsLzKVJO30

Thanks!

The P-08 should be able to do those sounds no problem.  Some of the sounds are more digitally oriented.  So, the P-12 might be a better choice for those sounds.  However, pretty much anything that can be done with an analog osc can be done on the P-08.
Jim Thorburn .  Toys-  Dave Smith: Prophet 08;
Pro 2; Prophet 12; EastWest Orchestral soft synths; Yamaha S-90; Yamaha Montage 8, Yamaha DX-7; KARP Odyssey; Ensoniq ESQ-1.  All run through a Cubase DAW with a Tascam DM-24 board.

Shaw

  • ***
  • 1111
Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #118 on: January 21, 2017, 10:51:08 AM »
However, I don't think Eventide has a dedicated distortion beyond their H9 unit.
Actually, the H9, the Eclipse and the Harmonizers all have great distirtions.  Eventide just isn't "known" for it because the boxes do so much more.
"Classical musicians go to the conservatories, rock´n roll musicians go to the garages." --- Frank Zappa

Re: REV2 (16-Voice Polyphonic Analog Synthesizer)
« Reply #119 on: January 21, 2017, 11:14:59 AM »
Flaws the Prophet '08 had, that might have been fixed on the REV 2.

1. Flimsy Buttons. REV 2 got the best looking ones on a DSI product so far.
2. Flimsy Encoders. By watching the Official release video of the REV 2, it looks better.
3. Lacking Gain compensation on the filter. REV 2 does sound better at the low end in the new demos, in my opinion.
4. Limited Oscillator options. More options, Sub oscillator and wave shaping added.
5. Low Audio Output. I would expect the REV 2 to be similar to the newer models.
6. Front panel print was on a sticker. Solved years ago.
7. Keybed had short travel depth and too sensitive aftertouch. This time it's Fatar which is great, Looks like TP/9s.
8. Small display. Still small, but higher resolution, easier to read, better viewing angle.
9. Sharing polyphony between splits was limited to maximum 4 on each layer. Same now but double polyphony.
10. Slope parameter was too subtle. Is now improved to do the extreme.

Still the Prophet '08 was much loved. It cut through the mix like a hot knife with it's punchy and "in your face" attitude.
And it's success gave a nice boost for future products, which now are made with greatest quality.

REV 2 kind of shows us how far DSI have come since the Prophet '08 was released.  They can make the REV 2 at a lower cost compared to the original despite all the the updates and improvements. I love what DSI have become. REV 2 is on my shopping list, you bet!
« Last Edit: January 21, 2017, 12:34:55 PM by robinkle »